» Vessel. Voice. Visionary.

Because, its my time.

Cut the String of Brokenness

Growing up, I had a lot of "friends". It was never an issue to make them because I deemed myself a social butterfly. Talking to people was rather easy for me, and subsequently making friends was too. Being older, the same isn't true. It's not that I've lost my charm for talking to people, it's that I allowed my circumstances to push people away. You don't realize how much things hurt you until you look behind you and recognize the string of brokeness that follows. I had broken relationships with people because of how hurt I was. I pushed those that cared away because I lumped them with those that appeared to but didn't. Now I look around at the lack of friendships I have, and quite frankly, it makes me sad. I want to have friends that I can call and say "get dressed, we're going out" or vice versa. I want to have friends that if my boyfriend goes out or my closest friend/roommate is with her friends or out, I don't have to be lonely, laying in the bed watching tv. I want to have friends that I can be transparent with, have fun, without worrying about whether they're thinking about how "holy" I should be. Going away to college was a great experience for me in that it taught me to be independent and such, but the experience also took me from my home, my friends, and my family. I know I have them, but in Philly, they aren't tangible. I can't go see them or hang out. That's what different about now. My boyfriend and roommate are both "home". Seeing their friends or family is as simple as a drive or train ride. I don't share the same simplicity. My journey takes more than three hours to another state. Maybe that's the saddest thing--when I am most in need of my comfort, it's out of reach. 

BUT, the point of this post is not all about being sad about not having friends- it's about this: cut the string of brokenness. Too often we get so wrapped up in situations and people that hurt us that we go out and sometimes unintentionally, hurt those around us. We don't let people get too close for fear of hurt, or we push away those that care because we don't see why or how they could. We lump everyone together and think the world is out to get us, when in actuality, either a small insignificant number or frankly no one is. Living in hurt hurts. Living in hurt stunts growth. Living in hurt limits the possibility of truly enjoying life and all that it has to offer. Living in hurt continuosly gives control to the source of the hurt. I lived in hurt so long and was so deep into it that I didn't see that I was isolating myself until it was revealed by others and ultimately by myself when it was too late. I realized I had isolated myself when I could scroll down my phonebook, or better yet, look around the room and realize there was not a single person I had an actual substantial friendship with. I realized I had allowed my hurt to consume me to the point where "are you okay?" wasn't even a question anymore--it became the statement of "oh she's just having another one of her days/moments". Living in hurt robs you of the ability to love and I think more importantly be loved. It's okay- you're human. But at the end of the day, you're not the only one who has ever been hurt and you surely won't be the last. The hurt that you're going through isn't unique unto you. Others have experienced debilitating hurts, and yet, they manage to still love and be loved.

Bottom line: Be mature enough to realize that as long as there is life within you, there is life to be lived. Forgive. Forget. Move on. Most importantly, never lose your ability to recognize, receive and reciprocate love. 

In His Awesomeness

"Castillo San Felipe del Morro has seen over 400 years of history. Inside these walls, people lived, worked and died. Their stories are a part of this place".

"It is an aesthetic. Talking to your neighbor is an art. To communicate is the meaning of life--the conversations, the smiles. Alienation is a sickness". 

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Both quotes were collected as I was on vacation in Puerto Rico, which by the way, was AMAZING! The first quote was taken from a sign in Castillo San Felipe del Morro, a fortification in San Juan. It was built over the course of 250 years to protect Spain's hold over Puerto Rico, an island everyone wanted. (Please research it, you won't be disappointed!). As I walked through the fort, I was in absolute awe and was stilled. I walked where centuries of soldiers walked, slept, trained, and died. I looked out upon the waters that those very same soldiers looked for their enemy. I sweated from the same sun that the soldiers woke up to. It took my breath away. Not that I've never went to a musuem in my lifetime, but it was different this time. It was different because for some reason, it was real to me. Sitting in the chapel where I'm sure hundreds of soldiers prayed that they either wouldn't die, would die with honor, for protection for their families or an end to the war, sobered me. And in the course of the tour, I thought about the awesomeness of God. That He gave humans the ability to build this majestic fort, in all it's intricacies and beauty, with tools that we would look at as inferior today. That He would allow a structure like this to be in existence for their centuries, our centuries and centuries to come. That in every carving and chisel, He showed Himself

Above is a picture I took of the fort. Like, wow. This is where I see God. In the way the water hits the rocks, but never washes them away. In the way I can see the ocean, the world beyond me, through the iron bars. In the way that the very same walls I touch to absorb the feel, absorbed the feel of hundreds of cannon balls repeatedly. To see and experience the walls that "people worked, lived and died" in is to experience God in His awesomeness. 

That brings me to my next quote. These words were said by one of the employees of the hotel I stayed at (which by the way, I would recommend a million times). He was talking about the reason why Old San Juan, where I stayed, was so beautiful to him. It was very close knit, houses were right next to each other, with balconies directly in line with one another. One could be walking and see right into one's home, while they watched tv or washed dishes or even where they slept. He told us how one man fought to preserve this sense of community within Old San Juan, the historic colonial style, while others wanted to tear it down and become "modernized". He expressed his displeasure with the latter with the words above. Now, the reason why what he said stuck out to me is because as this world becomes more "technologically advanced", we lose the sense of humanity. All the advances in phones, and computers, and buildings, and social media, and this and that, cause us to be more individualized, more alienated--and the man is right--it is a sickness. We can't talk to one another, can't communicate in a healthy way. We don't know who lives next door to us, let alone who we're in relationships/friendships with. We have dinner with our phones, sleep with our phones, wake up with our phones, walk with our phones, swim with our phones, fly with our phones, shower with our phones, cook with our phones, and the list goes on. Anything we want to do, you can bet someone has designed something to allow us to do it. We can no longer hold decent conversations because our 140 characters can do that for us. It makes me sad and I am both a victim and perpertrator. When the end of your life comes, what will you remember? The latest technology you had access to or the people you loved that you didn't? The amount of followers/friends you had on social media or the lack of them in real life? How much of your life you could connect to one device or how much of your life was broken? When I think of the fort and the tools it took them to build it, I only think of it how much we would say how they are inferior if used now, but just think--after hundreds of years, it's still standing. Houses that are built today fall to pieces in less than 10. Nothing is built to last, merely built to please--to look good but have no substance. It also makes me think of the true meaning of life. Is it to gather everything available and become tech saavy or LIVE? I would go with the latter. God created us to communicate, to bring joy to one another, to be there for one another in the time of need. He created us to be something, to do something, but most of all share something

So the next time you have a chance to upgrade to a better phone, or move to a more modern home, or post a photo from your family gathering on social media, take a second to think. Will this matter